Elective

  • Christian Ethics 10

    Christian Ethics 10

    This course is free for Prairie South students - offered through Cornerstone Cristian School - https://www.ccsmj.ca/DistanceLearningOpportunities

    This course focuses on the Christian Story. Beginning with your own personal story and then spending the majority of the course on the story of Jesus Christ, you will come away from this course with an understanding of Jesus and an appreciation of scripture as the story of the Christian community. This course includes a 10-hour community service project.

    Students will...

    • understand that one's life story is interrelated with one's communities' stories
    • appreciate scripture as the story of the Christian community
    • have knowledge of the Christian understanding of Jesus
    • realize that the Christian message calls us to serve as Jesus did
    • appreciate the impact that one's values and decisions make on the lives of oneself and others
    • cultivate a personal relationship with Jesus
  • Christian Ethics 20

    Christian Ethics 20

    This course is free for Prairie South students - offered through Cornerstone Cristian School - https://www.ccsmj.ca/DistanceLearningOpportunities

    The main focus of this course is understanding the nature of the Christian community, specifically the Church and its history and practices. Combined with this is the aspect of living the Christian life, including Christian moral guidelines and how these Christian principles inform various contemporary moral issues.

    Students will:

    • understand the nature of the Christian community
    • appreciate what belonging to and living in the Christian community entails
    • understand Christian moral guidelinessee
    • how Christian principles inform various contemporary moral issues
  • Christian Ethics 30

    Christian Ethics 30

    This course is free for Prairie South students - offered through Cornerstone Cristian School - https://www.ccsmj.ca/DistanceLearningOpportunities

    This course focuses on living as a Christian in a secular world. Understanding how the Christian message guides our search for self-understanding and discovering how Christianity gives meaning to relationships, life, beliefs, and death. There will also be a portion of this course devoted to world religions and cults.

    Students will:

    • appreciate how the Christian message guides our search for self-understanding
    • discover how Christianity gives meaning to life, death, and belief
    • understand relationships and commitments from a Christian perspective
    • understand and value the contributions of various world religions and spiritualities
  • Forensic Science 20L

    finger print forensic scienceForensic Science 20L Course Description:

    Forensic Science involves the use of scientific principles to analyze evidence for legal investigations. Forensic scientists collect, preserve, and analyse scientific evidence during the course of an investigation. In this course you will look at crime scene analysis, finger print analysis, trace evidence (including hair, fibers and poisons), blood, and forensic ballistics.

    The goals of the Forensics 20 Course are to develop:

    • understanding of the science behind Forensics, including real-life examples of its application in the solving of crimes;
    • awareness of the variety of techniques and technologies employed during a criminal investigation and performing some of these techniques in a lab setting;
    • teamwork and relationship skills, required in the area of forensics, particularly during an investigation;
    • opportunities to explore potential career options in the area of forensics;
    • problem-solving and critical thinking skills when analyzing cases and potential evidence.

     

    Credit Type:  Elective

    Teacher: Mr. Wandler

  • French 90/10/20/30

    french signFrench 90 Course Description:

    French 90 is an introductory interactive online French course that focuses on the basic communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting. Although previous knowledge of French would be beneficial, it is not necessary. Students engage in communication activities that center around the themes of family, food, cooking, leisure activities, friendship, and travel. The goal of this course is for students to use the French language in a purposeful and practical manner with a focus on communication in every aspect.

    Teacher: Mme. Boughen

    Required Textbook:

    Ca Marche! 1 [Toronto, Ont. Pearson Addison Wesley 2003]

     

    French 10 Course Description:

    French 10 is an interactive intermediate online French course that focuses on the basic communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting. Although not necessary, it would be very beneficial for students to have tanken French 90 as a pre-requisite before enrolling in this course.  Students engage in communication activities that center around the themes of family, food, hobbies, friendship, travel, and peer pressure. The goal of this course is for students to use the French language in a purposeful and practical manner with a focus on communication in every aspect. This course makes use of a variety of technologies in computer applications.

    Teacher: Mme. Boughen

    Required Textbook:

    Ca Marche! 2 [Toronto, Ont. Pearson Addison Wesley 2003]

     

    French 20 Course Description:

    French 20 is an intermediate interactive online French course that focuses on the core communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting. The goal of this course is for students to use the French language in a purposeful and practical manner with a focus on communication in every aspect.
    This course makes use of a variety of technologies in computer applications. Students need French 10 as a pre-requisite before enrolling in this course.

    Teacher: Mme. Boughen

    Required Textbook:

    Ca Marche! 3 [Toronto, Ont. Pearson Addison Wesley 2003]

     

    french stop signFrench 30 Course Description:

    French 30 is an intermediate interactive online French course that focuses on the basic communication skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and presenting. Students engage in communication activities that center around the themes of daily activities, physical activity and healthy lifestyles, and Francophone destinations. The goal of this course is for students to use the French language in a purposeful and practical manner with a focus on communication in every aspect. Students need to have French 20 as a pre-requisite before enrolling in this course.

    Teacher: Mme. Boughen

    Required Textbook:

    En Direct 1 [Toronto, Ont. Prentice Hall Canada Inc. 1993]

  • Leadership 10L

    Leadership 10L

    This course allows students to begin to develop and refine leadership skills that can be applied to their future experiences. The course will teach students about identifying various forms of leadership and provide them with opportunities to practice and reflect upon experiences they have with leadership. It will explore fundamental aspects of leadership like problem-solving, communication and self-awareness. It will teach students specifically about utilizing servant leadership as a means to become selfless, humble, and empowering leaders.

    Teacher: Mr. Sowden

     

    Outcomes and Indicators
    What is a Leader?  
    What are characteristics common in leaders?
    Who are individuals I know of that are leaders? How do I know that they are leaders? What makes them a leader? Are they a “good” or “bad” leader?
    How does leadership look different?
     
    Outcomes Indicators  
    WIL 1.1 Analyze characteristics of self that can be attributed to leadership. a.   Outline leadership characteristics held by self and others.
    b.   List the best characteristics that leaders should have.
     
    WIL 1.2 Identify examples of leadership. a.   List and describe examples of leadership.
    b.   Investigate a specific example of successful leadership or an individual considered to be a successful leader.
    c.   Explore a variety of different leaders for different cultures in history.
     
    WIL 1.3 Evaluate how leadership varies and looks different in different contexts and settings. a.   Identify characteristics of leadership that may be less successful in certain contexts and more successful in certain contexts.
    b.   Select two settings you are involved with and describe skills that would be successful in one setting, but not the other.
     
    WIL 1.4 Justify personal leadership development as an ongoing process. a.   Reflect on how you’ve changed as a leader throughout your life.
    b.   Identify a leader who has changed leadership characteristics over time.
     
     
    Professional Development  
    What does it mean to be self-aware?
    How does displaying self-awareness influence others?
    What are strategies that help team-building through developing self-awareness?
     
    Outcomes Indicators  
    PD 1.1 Analyze the importance of
    self-awareness and influence in relation to leadership.
    a.   Ask questions about how to be self-aware.
    b.   Make observations of leaders and the dialogue they use when practicing leadership.
     
    PD 1.2 Examine team-building strategies that you or others have participated in. a.   Engage in team-building strategies to gain an appreciation for their elements.
    b.   Outline key components of team-building strategies.
    c.   Propose team-building strategies for self and others to participate in.
     
     
    Leadership Dynamics  
    How is communication critical to leadership? How do leaders address problems?
    How do leaders navigate their relationships with others?
     
    Outcomes Indicators  
    LD 1.1 Evaluate personal communication practices. a.   Practice communicating with others.
    b.   Roleplay positive personal communication practices.
    c.   Identify personal communication practices.
     
    LD 1.2 Identify problem-solving strategies used by personally-determined leaders. a.   Brainstorm common problems and their potential solutions.
    b.   Observe sample conflicts and identify strategies used.
     
    LD 1.3 Design and implement strategies to empower others. a.   List ways that others have empowered you.
    b.   Create a plan to empower another individual.
     
    LD 1.4 Analyze the relationship between being an efficient, effective, and empowering leader. a.   Identify and critique an ideal combination of efficient, effective, and empowering.  
    LD 1.5 Create a personal action plan on being a self-aware, efficient, effective, and empowering leader. a.   Consult & interview leaders to develop a personal action plan for leadership.
    b.   Brainstorm practices to improve skills in self-awareness, being more efficient & effective, and empowering others.
     
     
    Servant Leadership & Practicum  
    What are fundamental components of servant leadership? How can individuals develop servant leadership?  
    Outcomes Indicators  
    SLP 1.1 - Explain and demonstrate elements of servant leadership. a.   Pose questions regarding elements of servant leadership.
    b.   Describe servant leadership.
     
    SLP 1.2 - Hypothesize personally-relevant opportunities for personal growth in practice of servant leadership. a.   Analyze opportunities for personal growth in servant leadership and assess personal impact from these opportunities.
    b.   Develop a list of opportunities relevant to the individual for servant leadership.
     
    SLP 1.3 - Explore servant leadership in a variety of local opportunities. a.   Participate in a local servant leadership opportunity.
    b.   Compare roles of servant leaders in a variety of local groups.
    c.   Reflect upon personal growth in servant leadership opportunities.
     
     
  • Mental Health Studies 20L

    • Elective
    • Pre-requisite: none

    The Mental Health Studies course is intended to help ensure students develop an understanding of positive mental health, a caring disposition, an understanding and respect for physical, mental, and emotional challenges, a commitment to the well-being of others and oneself, and a desire and ability to engage in social action for the common good. The course explores the answers to the following questions:

    What is positive mental health?
    How does positive mental health affect my well-being?
    What are mental health challenges?
    What supports are available to others and myself?
    What is stigma?
    How does stigma affect people’s lives?
    What is an addiction?
    Is there a connection between mental health and addictions?

  • Personal Fitness 20/30L

    • Provide Physical Education course in addition to PE 20 and PE 30 credit courses for students who wish to pursue a keen interest and passion for physical activity
    • Provide a physical education course that does not focus on sports for students who wish to be physically active but are not interested in a sports-related curriculum
    • Provide opportunities for personal fitness knowledge and individualized workout programs stressing safe, current, goal specific training methods

    Teacher: Mr. Sowden

  • Power Engineering 20L & 30L

    5th Class Power Engineering Program

    What is Power Engineering?  

    tristin power engineeringA "Power Engineer" is a technically skilled and knowledgeable professional who is certified and responsible to safely and efficiently operate equipment and processes that are regulated by boiler and pressure vessel legislation.

    Power Engineers are also known as:

    • Steam Engineer
    • Stationary Engineer
    • Operating Engineer
    • Steam Plant Operator
    • Steam Plant Operator
    • Boiler Operator
    • Building Operator
    • Refrigerator Plant Operator

    The basis of certification is the operation of steam boilers, pressure vessels, fired heaters, and refrigeration systems. However, the practical responsibilities also extend to other, related processes and utilities, which involve such auxiliary equipment as pumps, compressors, electrical generators, motors, steam turbines, gas turbines, heat exchangers, condensers, cooling towers, water treatment systems, air conditioning, systems, etc. The list is almost endless, since Power Engineers serve many different industries.

    The Power Engineering 20L and 30L courses are locally developed courses.  Students receive a high school credit for each course.  The curriculum for the courses has been adopted from SOPEEC - Standardization of Power Examinations Committee for a 5th Class Power Engineer.  The courses involve 50 - 75 hours of theory and 50 hours spent on a work-study obtaining the steam time requirements for the course and for TSask 5th Class Power Engineering Certification.  At the end of both courses students will have the opportunity to write their Class 5 Power Engineering exam.  If students are successful on this exam then they will recieve a Class 5 Power Engineering industry recognized certificate.

    Power Engineering 20L

    • Unit 1 – Boiler Details
    • Unit 2 – Boiler Fittings and Controls
    • Unit 3 – Boiler Operation, Maintenance
    • Unit 4 – Fuels and Combustion
    • Unit 5 – Piping and Valves
    • Unit 6 – Thermoil Systems
    • Unit 7 – Heating Systems and Human Comfort
    • Unit 8 – Basic Math

    Power Engineering 30L

    • Unit 1 – Plumbing & Auxiliaries
    • Unit 2 – Lighting
    • Unit 3 – Refrigeration
    • Unit 4 – Refrigeration & AC System Controls
    • Unit 5 – Pumps & Air Compressors
    • Unit 6 – Distributed Generation
    • Unit 7 – Provincial Acts, Regulations & Adopted Codes
    • Unit 8 – Applied Science
    • Unit 9 – Safety
    • Unit 10 – Electricity
    • Unit 11 – Welding
    • Unit 12 – Water Treatment

    pdfPower Engineering 5th Class Pamphlet

    pdfIntroduction to Power_Engineering 20L and 30L Overview

     Have a question?  Check out our FAQ area

    Rewards of a Career in Power Engineering

     

    Press - Media

     

    Work-Study Course Component

    Plant Work Experience

    Mobile Lab Work Experience

    Layout of the Mobile Lab » mobile lab

     

     

     360° Virtual Tour »

     

    General Information

     

    A Career in Power Engineering

    July 10, 2013 - Ken Campbell

    For every large group of buildings, factories or industrial sites Power is critical to not only keeping lights on but is the heart beat of all mechanical, electrical and electronic operations. Power Engineers or Stationary Engineers are the professionals that keep power plants running in hospitals, pulp mills, oil upgraders, refineries, manufacturing plants and countless other operations. Canada relies on Power Engineers as much as we do on Doctors, Nurses, Police or School teachers, just most people do not know it.

    Power Engineers get their start one of two ways. Many start as entry level labourers or employees before getting their first Power Engineering job where they work under certified power engineers in a power house, while doing distance education. The second route is to attend a college which hopefully has a power boiler on site that will allow one to get their firing or hands on time. Both routes are very cost effective ways to an excellent profession, with two years of full time study giving students a leg up into the job market where they can reasonably expect to make $25-35 right away.

    Power Engineers have 5 levels in Canada. With a first class power engineer being considered a Chief Engineer in charge of very large power plants and looking after the safety and efficient operation, while supervising dozens of Power Engineers. 1st Class Engineers can be considered equivalent to Mechanical or Electrical Engineers in theoretical knowledge but their hands on operating experience gives them the expertise to be in charge of very powerful boilers.

    Entry level Power Engineers are often 4th Class Power Engineers, who perform a lot of field and monitoring work. 3rd class Power Engineers often perform a lot of maintenance and monitor the efficient operation of Coal, Natural Gas and Bio-energy boilers. 2nd class both relieve for the 1st class engineer and provide supervision for both engineers and contractors on site. 5th class power engineers are often in charge of refrigeration plants such as ice rinks.

    Top first class engineers take years or even decades to get to their top positions and often make 150,000- 200,000 per year. The career path means that there is both room to grow and vacancies occurring at every level. With close to 30, 000 Power Engineers employed in Canada with the median age being over 45 years old, we expect to see over 11,000 job vacancies with only 8,000 expected new power engineers graduating from colleges. Power Engineering or Stationary Engineering is a great field to get into.

    http://redsealrecruiting.com/a-career-in-power-engineering/ 

     

    Link to this page: https://virtualschool.prairiesouth.ca/class-5-power-engineering